Interior landscaping is something that many of us will never have to worry about but for large buildings like hotels, shopping centres and corporate head quarters they often have large foyers or atrium’s that can feel a bit empty. Sure there is something impressive about a large emtpy space but there is something welcoming about filling that space with some life. That is where interior landscapes come in and as you will see they can span from inbuilt ponds to just nicely scattered flower pots.


A feature planter is a flower pots, usually large in size, that is set in a position that makes it a focal point in the garden or interior. There are many different planters out there and it is often not only the design of the pot but also the design of the surroundings that make the concept work.


We all know what shape comes to mind when we say flower pot, sadly not my own concrete planters, but the iconic tapered design. This is a pot that is seen the world over from cheap high street retailers to designer boutiques, so why is it so globally successful?


The use of rectangular planters can be from simply holding plants to actually dividing space. The shape of these planters mean that they lend themselves to being used as space dividers either indoors or outdoors. They obviously aren’t sound proof so if it’s just a segregation of zones you are after then this could work well.


It seems that if you want nice planters or flower pots then a good place to head is the North European coast. I have come across more than one supplier of high end, large planters and the sources are usually Belgium or Holland. I can’t explain this but I guess from a geographical point of view it it’s pretty well connected in Europe and it not land locked so can get supplies in and out easily. Belgium and Holland also have a good design style that is less exuberant and more universal than southern European producers.


As I always say concrete is not only great for making planters and flower pots but also many other things. In fact in recent times it has seen a resergence in popularity and companies are trying to create the effect of concrete but with better suited materials. Concrete is a great material for compressive requirements but it’s pretty rubbish for tensile or flexural strength. Worktops are a good example of where concrete is used but it isn’t optimal for the use. It will stain easily with kitchen use, (which could be regarded as charming) and will chip when you drop something on the edge, not so charming.

Let have a look at some products in concrete or concrete effect material.


It would be a bit silly to preech about concrete flower pots because you either love or hate them. Some people have preconceived ideas about what concrete is and hate it, my Dad being one. I think this is because they think of grotty 70’s tower blocks and the association to them. We in the design world however relate it to an industrial, versatile and cool material that gives us the chance to make some really cool shapes that are durable and strong.


Kornegay Design Planters are very high quality cast concrete planters with a faceted or geometric form. They are similar to my designs but less dramatic and angular. This means that they are easier to make but no less desirable for it. The website is full of wonderfully shot images of the companies work in studio settings much like you would see from a ceramists studio


Iota are one of the largest and best known suppliers of landscape products in the UK and as a result they have some great products.  Whilst their range extends over more than just planters and flower pots the most interesting range is just that. They also do water features, benches, bins anything really and all to a high quality and stylish design


The definition of an architectural planter is really no different to a normal one but customers tend to be looking for a harder wearing, higher quality environment relevant design. Many pots end up being boxes which I personally think is a bit boring and uncreative but I can also see the reasoning behind it.